Hunterdon County probably holds the record for the most 19th century iron truss bridges that are still in use. In Delaware Township alone there are nine iron truss bridges, not including the Covered Bridge, which is also a truss bridge. The most important of these iron truss bridges is the one crossing the Lockatong Creek on Rosemont-Raven Rock Road. That bridge is an outstanding example of the urge to lend some grandeur to a very functional structure. None of the other township bridges quite matches it.

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The Amwell-Hopewell Road of 1736

by Marfy Goodspeed on July 5, 2014

in Hunterdon County

The Road from Howell’s Mills and
John Reading’s Plantation to Trenton

Recently I wrote about the earliest known public road in Hunterdon County, recorded in January 1721/22 (The Amwell Road of 1721.) The next earliest, at least for the southern part of the county, was dated 1736, and followed part of the earlier route.

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Similar Enthusiasm Seldom Seen Nowadays, Says Observer
Political Tactics Are Recalled

by Egbert T. Bush, Stockton, N.J. published in the Hunterdon County Democrat, November 3, 1932

Mr. Bush stated at one time that he did not chose the headlines for his articles—that was left to the editors of the Hunterdon Democrat. So, although he does discuss those July 4th toasts, there is much more in this article.

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The Amwell Road of 1721

by Marfy Goodspeed on June 20, 2014

in Hunterdon County

There is something fascinating about old roads, especially when their routes differ from the ones we know today. One of the very oldest roads in Hunterdon County was “layed out” in December 1721 and recorded in January 1721/22.

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Jacob’s Path, an 1813 Shortcut

by Marfy Goodspeed on June 13, 2014

in Hunterdon County

In his article, “Old Sentinel Oak Has Passed,” Egbert T. Bush wrote that the old oak, across the road from the Baptist Church in Stockton, close to where Route 523 meets Main Street, stood near a “never-failing stream.” This stream runs along Route 523 for some distance and today is a little hard to find. But it does show up on Google maps, and is a clue to two interesting road records of 1813.

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Woodman’s Axe Removes Famous Stockton Tree; Died of Old Age
Rings Show Good, Bad Years

by Egbert T. Bush, Stockton, N.J.
published in the Hunterdon County Democrat, April 4, 1935

Trees were a subject dear to Mr. Bush’s heart. This article is just one of many in which he waxed both poetic and nostalgic about the grand old trees of his neighborhood.

Included in this article is some early history of the area of Stockton where Route 523, Old Prallsville Road, Ferry Street and Route 29 (Risler Street) all come together. Rather than interrupt Mr. Bush with a long parentheses, I will save my comments for the end of his article.

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The Locktown Christian Church Cemetery

by Marfy Goodspeed on May 24, 2014

in Delaware Township

Locktown Christian Church Cemetery

Locktown Christian Church Cemetery

As a follow-up to my recent article on the history of the Locktown Christian Church, here is a list of the people known to be buried in the cemetery adjacent to the church.

A visit to this interesting cemetery will quickly reveal that there are many graves here that are unmarked. So it is impossible to know who might be the earliest person buried here. The earliest gravestone is for Charity Alley who died in 1843, although Cornelius Williamson Carrell might have died a couple years before that. Oddly enough, Ms. Alley comes first on the list. The last known grave to be added was for Arthur E. Jungblut in 1999.

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Historic Hunterdon Church For Sale

by Marfy Goodspeed on May 17, 2014

in Delaware Township

Once Known as the Locktown Christian Church

Locktown Christian Church, c.1900 (from an old postcard)

Locktown Christian Church, c.1900 (from an old postcard)

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A Chestnut That Acted As Host to a Younger Tree
- Biggest Oak of Them All

by Egbert T. Bush, Stockton, N.J.
published in the Hunterdon County Democrat, January 1, 1931

This month is a big allergy month for me, so I looked up what Mr. Bush had to say about trees. Turns out—quite a lot. Bush had a great affection for the grand old trees that had survived the previous century, and frequently mentioned them in his articles. Now that our trees are leafing out, it seems appropriate to publish this essay. The willow described here once stood in front of Roger Byrom’s house in Headquarters. 

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I am not a book reviewer, and don’t intend to be. These are very short notices of books I have recently acquired. No one has asked me to review these books, or has sent me free copies, or in any other way influenced my opinions about them.  Continue reading—

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